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20130201
20130228
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Search Results 0 to 20 of about 21 (some duplicates have been removed)
. in the maya city of copan, a jeweler fashioned rare shell and jade for his powerful lord. in mexico, living artisans echo the economy of a vanished civilization. and in teotihuacan, evidence of mass production has now been unearthed. tiny faces of clay reflect the men and women who made them a thousand years ago. on the other side of the world, in the ancient roman city of ostia, huge merchant ships were part of an economy much like our own. and today, the tanners of morocco still practice their ancient craft, living proof that economies have evolved out of the past. everyone who has ever lived has been part of an economic system. iel bote grande...mil pesos! economic systems are simply the ways people produce, distribute and consume things -- everything and anything, from tortillas to stocks and bonds. for 10,000, 10,000 an eighth. today, as in the past, economic systems lie at the heart of how a society is organized. archaeologists search for these systems because they believe economies hold the key to understanding ancient societies. archaeologist william sanders. the economy of any give
on earth. we live on the frozen tundra and in the searing deserts. we live in thriving cities of millions and in isolated camps of a few dozen. some societies seem simple because they are small and their members are self-sufficient and use simple tools. others seem complex because they have large populations and people depend on each other for food and goods and use sophisticated technology. in between, there is a range that fills the spectrum. all of these differences are cultural, learned behavior, the result of a complex interaction between our inventiveness and our natural environments. as we search for new horizons, our inventiveness thrusts us across the boundaries of space, into new worlds. this new view of earth dispels an ancient myopia -- the artificial boundaries of our states and the politics that often divide us. here is a vision of one planet and one family of humankind. but the view from earth reminds us of a common human dilemma, the rise and fall of our many ways of life. here, among the ruins of ancient civilizations, archaeologists are retracing the steps in a long and
witness to its greatness. in the first century b.c., the city of one million was master of the mediterranean world. rome's empire stretched from spain in the west to syria and egypt in the east. the roman elite were rich beyond measure. they ranged from the cunning and prudent julius caesar... to the intellectually inclined augustus... to cruel caligula, deviser of public spectacles that included murder .....to nero, who, it's said, kicked his wife to death for rebuking him. the upper classes were well educated, connected by kinship, business and political ties. wearied by the crowds and hectic pace of roman life, they pined for greater leisure and the chance it gave to contemplate the finer things of life. each spring, as the senate recessed, roman power brokers -- the patrician families, senators, and untold numbers of entrepreneurs made rich by roman dominance -turned to the bay of naples. over generations, they built lavish villas along the shoreline of campania. the villa pausilypon -a greek name meaning "the end of pain" -had a private theater for the pleasure of i
,400 years old. here, in a broad valley in central mexico, stand the ruins of what was once the largest city in the new world. beneath an intricate complex of dwellings, archaeologists are uncovering startling evidence of family life. and in italy, as archaeologists explore the ruins of pompeii, new investigations shed light on the nature of the roman family and the surprising role of slaves. who do we live with and why ? what can these ancient families tell us about our own families ? around the world, archaeologists are looking far beyond the palaces and temples into the households of common people, bringing families to life out of the past. come forward all the way. oooh ! that's it. good. hold on me. come forward. ease the baby out with little pushes. come on. you can do it. beautiful ! the baby's coming up to you. waaahh ! keach: every newborn child immediately confronts three basic needs -- food, shelter and education. in the beginning, these needs are met at home. but in industrial societies, that soon changes. teacher: times three... we educate our children in schools. how would you
a decade. president obama is expected to speak about gun violence during an address in his home city of chicago today. a media advocacy group says a record number of journalists were imprisoned around the world last year in what it termed a deteriorating environment for press freedom. the committee to protect journalists says 232 journalists were jailed last year, the highest number since surveying began in 1990. 70 journalists were killed in a line of duty, an increase of more than 40% from the previous year. a top native american leader is urging house lawmakers to reauthorize the violence against women act and follow tribal governments to prosecute non- native men who abuse women on tribal lands. jefferson kiel, president of the national congress of american indians, made the remarks thursday in the state of indian nations address. he said the death rate of native women on some reservations is 10 times the national average. nearly 60% of native women are married to non-native men, and according to justice department data, non-native men carry out 70% of reported rapes against nati
in the protest as did a number of interfaith organizations. several smaller parallel rallies were held in cities across the country. more after headlines. if the obama administration has confirmed reports it's drafted a backup plan should congress fail to pass congress of the immigration reform. according to usada, the obama proposal would allow undocumented immigrants to obtain legal permanent residency status within eight years while containing massive spending on border militarization. president obama returned to his hometown of chicago on friday as part of a post-state of the union tour. he announced the visit in the aftermath of the killing a 15- year-old hadiya pendleton, a chicago teen shot days -- shot dead just days after performing at obama's second term inauguration. obama said the rate of killing people in chicago is equivalent to newtown massacre occurring every four months. >> something profound and uniquely heartbreaking and tragic, obviously, about a group of six-year olds being killed, but last year there were 443 murders with a firearm on the streets of this city, and 65 of tho
kids exercise. city kids don't, for the most part. there have been interesting studies, for example, done comparing physical activity levels in inner city kids compared with suburban kids and one of the things you find is that... inner city kids may do very well on things like push-ups, sit-ups and less well in running and aerobic type of activities. and the investigators discovered that the reason that that had happened was because in this particular study which had been done in a large city that coaches didn't let the kids during p.e., that they had, they didn't let them go out on the playground because the playground was dangerous. p.e. was inside and so the activities that they did was a lot of calisthenics, sit-ups, push-ups, things like that. catherine parrish: i hear lots of stories when i see these kids for check-ups, and many of them are overweight, about how, "i'd like to play a sport but my school doesn't have that." "i can't get to the program. it's on the other side of town." "it's not safe to ride a bike in my neighborhood." "i can't... my bike got stolen. i haven't be
are two very similar cities, equal amounts of rain, close to one another physically, socioeconomically quite similar. the amount of violent crime in those two cities is virtually identical. but if you look at the number of murders, it's ten times higher in seattle than it is in vancouver. what's the difference? the difference, very simply, is that in the united states, you can easily purchase guns. in canada, you cannot. we've lost two children to guns in this practice. both teenagers-- one was caught in a gun exchange over drug money. another was shot because she was dating someone's boyfriend at twelve. - drugs. - drugs. - alcohol. - alcohol. they very much increase the impulsive amounts of violent behavior as they are intended to be dis-inhibitors of ourselves. and so alcohol and drugs, cocaine in particular, is very provocative to violence. a lot of guys-- they are really fighting over the drugs now. they want to sell drugs because it's good way to make money. i think certainly drugs, gangs, these are predisposing factors. we know from the studies-- kids who take drugs, kids who ar
is not so easy for a lot of people. in fact, back at city college when we used to hire teachers, we would have students come in and so let the teachers perform and do a 10-minute gig on the blackboard. and we'd always have a student ask the following question 'cause we wanted to ask a question, which sounded very easy but wasn't. like if you ask the teacher like, "what's the wavelength of the--line with a hydrogen transition?" he could say, "oh, i see, it's a trick." and he say, "oh, i don't know the answer to that, but i'll look it up and i'll tell you next time," 'cause that's a kind of question you know-- we're not supposed to know the answer to, right? but we wanted to ask the prospective instructors a question for which they thought they ought to know the answer, like an easy question. and we found a very, very easy question that not many people could answer. and the reason they couldn't answer is 'cause they didn't have the framework that you guys have right now. and it's this: first of all, we didn't word the question very nicely. we'd have the students say, "hey, when i take an ob
of driving crowded city streets, meeting deadlines, paying bills, ggling the many obligations and activities in our lives. you may be expected to work 60 or 70 hours a week, and you're trying to balance home life with work life and being a parent and all these different social and cultural roles. and those are stressors, i think, that throughout the centuries people have felt, relative to their own time frame. gail wyatt: we need to appreciate, it's not just adults who are stressed. kids have a lot of pressure on them, to do their homework, to have friends, to make friends, to-- you know, connect in so many different ways, to participate in extracurricular activities, to do well, to be what their parents want them to be, lots of stressors. a certain amount of stress is necessary for life. deborah khoshaba: on a moment-to-moment basis, our body is always in the process of gauging how much arousal we need to function. okay? see, right now as i'm speaking, my sympathetic nervous system is on, and although i don't feel anxiety, i do feel a certain amount of arousal. you would say the organism's
't it? but the musicians are trained to read that pattern. and then you get out of the city and you go up a country at nighttime and you're looking out a night when there's new moon, huh? the moon's on the other side and you look out and you see the milky way and you see all the stars and you see more stars than you can see when you're in the city. that's because the city lights, of course, light up the sky and the sky is reflecting light and only the brightest stars will show through, huh? but in the country, you see many, many, many. and sometimes you also are moved. you get that sort of emotional... all of a sudden you're connected, all of a sudden-- and you're not quite connected and you start to wonder and you wonder what is going on out there and then you realize there are more stars in the sky than there are grains of sand on all the beaches of the world. honey, a lot of grains of sand, more stars. not in your visible view, but out beyond. and you wonder is there a pattern that dictates what those stars are doing, why they shine, how they move, how they relate to one another? an
. and most--the little particles make up... take 133 million tons. that's several city blocks. scrunch all those atoms up, 133 million tons, scrunch them up until all these things here cave into one another. you got the size of a pea. so take the size of a pea and spread out a city block, that's how atoms are, most of them. so these things go right through our body without ever making a direct hit. you get, maybe, one direct hit per year on the average, one got me, okay? very, very seldom, okay? you know what? 1987, the supernova-- the supernova in the heavens-- and showered the whole universe with neutrinos. and neutrino flecks were so enormous that about one out of every 248 people, something like that, got one of those neutrinos, caught one and the rest went just right by through us, right through the other side, never, never making a direct hit. why? because the space between the little particles of the atom are enormous compared to the size of the particular nucleons or electrons. kinda neat, huh? so if there's a great big beam of neutrons coming right by, you just walk right through
city, all you got to do is take a helicopter, just go up and wait three hours and come back down again, okay? what's wrong with that? that helicopter doesn't go up and just stay there. that helicopter is moving just as fast as the earth, and so it just keeps moving around like that, you see? so you're riding an airplane. you've been in an airplane? you flip a coin. when you flip a coin, do you have to adjust for the motion of the plane? let's suppose you're going this way 600 miles an hour. i'm like, "man, if i flip that coin, boom, "that coin gonna go bam, 600 miles an hour against the passenger in the back seat." - that happen? - no. why doesn't it happen? what if you were on a plane and someone says, "hey, how come, man? i flipped a coin, flipped it, come right back down." it's not that--i know i'm going 600 miles an hour. when i flipped it--in fact, you ever be in an airplane, you see a fly come by? man, that fly going 600 miles an hour... [laughter] ...with respect to the ground down below, isn't that true? but how about the coin flip? how come when you flip the coin it doesn't go
student at city college in san francisco in 1980. got into conceptual physics, it spurred her on. today, she is a design engineer at jet propulsion labs in california at pasadena, and she is working on these fly-by missions and all that stuff and right now she is doing what, you are making a pod to fly in the next space shuttle, and that's what she is doing, okay? tinnie, hold these up and then tell me which of those two has the most mass? they feel the same to me. these are the same weight gang, okay? but i want you to do something else tinnie. i want you to hold it at the midpoint, and then rotate it like this. and now try this one. any difference? this is hard to rotate. very much hard. take them both and do it. like something up here? yeah, you can really feel the difference. let's try this. put this in your hand, flip that like this, you do like this, flip it. okay, now change gang, now change. oh-oh-oh-oh huh? guess how the lead is distributed inside here, thanks very much, tinnie. guess how the lead is distributed, gang. guess where it's closer to the center. take a guess. they'r
this thing, we could generate electricity to light up cities. and sure enough, we do. and we have devices like this. and we put a waterfall over here and turn it, use the energy of that waterfall, potential, kinetic, rotational, mechanical, off it goes this light, huh? do that, or we could put a steam turbine here, direct some expanding steam against the turbine, against the paddle wheel and turn it. and so our civilization really rests on devices like this. but there's gotta be some energy input to be transformed over here. now, here's a neat little thing. when i turn this and i unscrew the lamp, it becomes easier to turn. easier to turn. why? well, when it's unhooked, there's no energy going off. and so what i'm turning against now is a friction. but when it's hooked up, i'm pushing against the friction plus the electricity. so let's--i can show you that. can i have a volunteer? could you come up here, please? what i'm gonna do-- you stand over here, and what i want you to do-- i'm not gonna look, i'm gonna look over here, okay? and i want you to unscrew that, and i'll tell you when it'
." but they really haven't been to the intensive care units of the city hospitals, of people who are still dying of the disease. they haven't been in the doctor's offices of the people who are suffering from resistant strains who are now starting to see the end. and they certainly haven't been to the developing countries where the virus is running rampant. in africa, aids is already having an enormous impact. as i said earlier, it's already surpassed malaria as the number one killer. in addition to that it's killing young people, often uryoung pele in wm the county hainvest lot, in terms of education. and so in that respect, it's been very costly. it's also costly socially in ter of leing-- leaving a large number of children without both parents. and all indications are that its impact is going to get worse, maybe a lot worse. it's likely also that it's going to get much worse that it already is in some parts of asia. other sexually transmitted diseases may have taken a backseat to headlines about hiv, but they still take their toll. david bennett: we estimate, you know, 250 million, 300 million
the city is gaining notoriety for something else. its community gardens like alemany farm, where hundreds of people get involved in growing things. but since this 4.5 acre farm is by interstate 280, even longtime residents unknowingly drive right past this farm by the freeway. >> you know, i've driven by this road hundreds of times. i've never even seen this farm or heard of this farm. but it's beautiful here. >> the alemany farm is located basically right in the middle of san francisco. it's on the southern side of the city right next to the 280. we're lucky in that the space is so large that we have a big buffer zone between the freeway and where we grow. this space was basically an illegal dump. and people from all over the city would drive down alemany boulevard, pull off, and dump their refrigerators, whatever it was they didn't want. and so people in the alemany housing community decided they didn't want a dump in their neighborhood. >> you'll find a festive atmosphere on this community-organized farm. run largely by volunteers, there's a variety of crops, like collard greens, rainb
californiacountry.org for more information. >> welcome back. beyond the bustle of the big city is an undiscovered paradise called "california country." >> ask any great chef about their favorite dish and they'll tell you making really great food takes ability, talent, dexterity, and no matter how big or small the dish is, for many it takes a certain amount of artistry. every artist likes to start with a really great canvas. and for chefs down here in san diego, nothing gets better than this. but it can be turned into a masterpiece thanks to one restaurant's unique philosophy on using farm fresh food. these are the days i love my job, let me tell you. where to start? in san diego, california's second largest city, there are beautiful places and people all around you. this is where skinny is always in and portion control is a must. but surprisingly, this is also the place where you can find good old-fashioned comfort food served up in heaping portions like this. >> it's good food and lots of it. and just generally wonderful. >> well, this is my first time here. they've been telling me about how goo
and pristine countryside in petaluma. and it was just that picturesque backdrop that attracted city slicker and hollywood producer laura howard to the area with a unique idea. >> i just packed up my bs and said i'm done with l.a., and i want to go find some goats and have a go at this. so, drove to sonoma county 'cause that's where, you know, all the big cheese companies and yogurt companies were. >> she just said, you know, look, this is what i want to do. i want to make a goat ice cream, and i want tuse your milk. >> and they just had a flavor named after them. we have a ozen yogurt now called "brownie and clyde." this is bubbles...blossom...hi, blossom. >> so laura left la-la land for the land of laloo's, which is the name of her newest project: goat milk ice cream, the first of its kind on the market. ice cream is just the latest product to be derived from the nutrient-rich and naturally low-in-calorie goat milk. from cheeses to yogurts, goat milk is gaining popularity across california. the golden state has more than 30,000 milking goats, making it tops in the nation, all of which does
Search Results 0 to 20 of about 21 (some duplicates have been removed)